Nurse Clinics

Nurse Clinics

Wide range of care and advice, including weight, geriatric, puppy/kitten and dental clinics.

We offer a range of clinics with our nursing team, which fulfil a very different role to that of consultations with our vets, through they often work in tandem.


In these clinics we can offer you a more personal chat about your pet and their welfare, and can cover a range of services focussed on preventative care, including weight management, support for elderly patients, advice for first time owners and care for new and young pets, behavioural training, flea and worming routines and dental hygiene.

Our nurses can also help to support you and your pet post-surgery or during illness.


Routine clinics available:

  • Puppy and kitten clinics

  • Six-month check-ups check between booster vaccinations

  • Post-op checks and suture removal

  • Dental health care and checks

  • Parasite control advice

  • Giving medication

  • Nutritional advice clinics

We charge an appointment fee of £20, correct as of January 2021.

Bespoke nurse support clinics:


· Diabetic support clinics run by Jane Edwards and Wendy Hudspith. These support appointments are offered as a package for four appointments, to help support you with your newly diagnosed pet, or they can be used at any point of diabetic treatment. £32 or first month free


· Dermatology sampling carried out by Nicola Davies

The Benefits of Nurse Clinics

Visiting our nurse clinics has a number of benefits to you and your pet, the biggest being that you can have a double check that everything you are doing is suitable for your pet, and if not, what you can do to improve things.


Our main goal is always to improve animal welfare, so having a nurse work with you as an individual owner to improve welfare will always yield some results. Even experienced owners may find something they can change, or discover new ideas.

A Nurse vs a Vet – Some Considerations

While nurse clinics are a great and essential part of our veterinary practice, there are a few considerations you should make before booking one.


The main thing to remember is that a nurse is not a vet – as such, they cannot legally diagnose your animal. If your animal is looking unwell, or injured, a nurse can only advise that you see a vet, so it is better to see a vet in the first place.


Should a nurse notice something during their consult, they will also refer you to the vet. Try not to push for an answer from them, as their role is not to diagnose illness.


A nurse also cannot prescribe drugs, meaning you cannot bring your sick animal into a nurse clinic and expect to receive drugs afterwards – in this case too, a vet must be seen.


This extends to regular patients who might want to change a drug or dose. A nurse cannot change a prescription without seeing a vet first. By all means, discuss the drug, what it does, the best way to administer it, and so on.


However, just be aware any changes will have to be made by a vet.